StudentLecture_25 - CHM 11500, Lecture 25, 11/22/2010 Exam...

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1 CHM 11500, Lecture 25, 11/22/2010 Exam III, Tonight, 11/22, 6:00 pm , Hall of Music. Reading Assignments and Learning Objectives for Lectures 15-22 or 23 (through polymers) Additional material in Lectures 15-22 or 23 Labs 6, 7, & 8 in Chapters Lab: No lab this week Reading: Interchapter: The Chemistry of Modern Materials, Pages 656- 669 The final 2 homework assignments will be available for 3 weeks each due to the Thanksgiving Holiday. Assignment H13 due Friday, 12/3 Assignment H14 due Friday, 12/10 Final Exam: 1-3 pm, Wednesday, December 15. Hall of Music
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2 Microscopic vs. Macroscopic Having looked at the types of crystalline bonds and their molecular-level order, we now will look at the ____________________ properties and characteristics of some __________________ materials: Ceramics Metals Semiconductors
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3 ceramic Solid inorganic compounds that combine metal and non-metal atoms and in which bonding ranges from ionic to covalent. Examples: Clays Glasses Bricks Cement Tile Sea shells Sea urchin spines are made of CaCO 3 and MgCO 3
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4 Properties of Ceramics Generally they are: Hard Brittle Inflexible Thermal insulators Most are electrical insulators (some conduct electricity) Some are opaque, some are transparent
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5 Classes of Ceramics: glasses amorphous (Non-crystalline) Formed by melting the raw materials and then cooling rapidly Most common: silicate glasses, derived from SiO 2 Can modify properties by including impurities such as other oxides (Na 2 O, CaO, Al 2 O 3 , etc.) Pyrex glass (used for beakers and other chemistry glassware and for kitchen ovenware) is a borosilicate glass because it incorporates boric oxides. Pyrex glass thus withstands temperature changes much better than “standard” glass.
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6 Silicate Glass Structure ordered SiO 2 structure disordered SiO 2 structure SiO 2 structure with Na 2 O added (grey are Na+ ions)
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7 Silicate Glass Structure A B C Which is a network covalent crystalline material?
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8 Ceramic and Glass Materials These are used in a wide range of biomedical applications Bone implants Strength, toughness, low wear rate, bio-inert Cardiovascular Stents Ceramic coating releases drug Glass beads to treat inoperable liver cancer
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Glass beads doped with 90 Y Inserted through catheter into an artery that feeds liver (and liver tumors). lodge
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course CHEM 116 taught by Professor Stevenson during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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StudentLecture_25 - CHM 11500, Lecture 25, 11/22/2010 Exam...

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