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Unformatted text preview: Cheating is not worth it Cornell Code of Academic Integrity I. GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS A.Specific Guidelines for Courses 1.Examinations. During in-class examinations no student may use, give, or receive any assistance or information not given in the examination or by the proctor. No student may take an examination for another student. The student is responsible for understanding the conditions under which the examination will be taken. Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Prep for Thursday... Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Prep for Thursday... minimum: pp54—69 if you need to skip, skip the frame problem, Sperber & Karmiloff-Smith Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Prep for Thursday... minimum: pp54—69 if you need to skip, skip the frame problem, Sperber & Karmiloff-Smith a mere 9 pages Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Robyn Carston from Cognitive Science: an introduction Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Aristotle’s Law of Contiguity Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Aristotle’s Law of Contiguity Things or events that occur close to each other in space or time tend to get linked together in the mind. Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Aristotle’s Law of Contiguity Things or events that occur close to each other in space or time tend to get linked together in the mind. example: If you think of a cup, you may think of a saucer; if you think of making coffee, you may then think of drinking that coffee. Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Phonetic analysis THE INTERNATIONAL PHONETIC ALPHABET (revised to 2005) CONSONANTS (PULMONIC) © 2005 IPA Alveolar Post alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyngeal Glottal Bilabial Labiodental Dental Plosive L PHONETIC ALPHABET (revised to 2005) © 2005 IPA olar Post alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyngeal Glottal Nasal ? J N P Y Z<<[ <h i m @<< A<<B C<<D E<<F G K L M O Q \<< ]<<^ _<<` a<<b c<<d e<<f < Trill Tap or Flap Fricative Lateral fricative Approximant Lateral approximant ><<? I J N P <<<<! R<<S T<< U V<<W X< Y Z<<[ g<<h i m < < ;<<= H ! @<< A<<B C<<D E<<F G K L M O Q \<< ]<<^ _<<` a<<b c<<d e<<f < < j < k n l o < j < k n l o Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote articulations judged impossible. CONSONANTS (NON-PULMONIC) Clicks Voiced implosives Ejectives VOWELS Front Close Central Back represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote articulations judged impossible. VOWELS jectives xamples: ilabial ental/alveolar elar lveolar fricative Front Close Central Back $ % Close-mid 67 +* &' + ! 0 8 () ,12 "# p " ! r Bilabial Dental (Post)alveolar Palatoalveolar Alveolar lateral q # s t Bilabial Dental/alveolar Palatal Velar Uvular ’ ;’ >’ C’ X’ Examples: Bilabial Dental/alveolar Velar Alveolar fricative $ % Close-mid 67 +* &' + ! 0 8 () ,12 "# Open-mid OTHER SYMBOLS <<<<Voiceless labial-velar fricative Open-mid Open latal fricatives eolar lateral flap us ./ 5 9 34 Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. SUPRASEGMENTALS Z and _ ( le articulations y two symbols f necessary. C;<<>X Lè l with a descender, e.g. !" !# <u <v << Primary stress Secondary stress Long #T-8J!">6Z!J Advanced Retracted Centralized Velarized Pharyngealized < Velarized or pharyngealized £ +y z +| } +Ä Å High Mid +{ +~  +Ç É ˆ ë<<3ë !!% Dental > í<?í ! Minor (foot) group î<<3î !!' Apical > ï<?ï Major (intonation) group ó<< ?ó ò Laminal > ò<?ò <x Syllable break i$x9C> ö<?ö !!* Nasalized +õ Linking (absence of a break) <<? <ù Nasal release ?ù TONES Tuesday, September 28, < ? !ü Lateral release ?ü 2010 LEVEL AND WORD ACCENTS CONTOUR Extra-short !!!!! w Half-long +u +v +w phonemes are (classes of) speech sounds Simultaneous ≠<< <Voiced labial-velar approximant Ø<<<<<Voiced labial-palatal approximant ∞ Voiceless epiglottal fricative ±<<<<< Voiced epiglottal fricative ≤<< <<<Epiglottal plosive Voiceless Voiced Aspirated More rounded Less rounded ´<¨ <<Æ ! : Open Alveolo-palatal fricatives Voiced alveolar lateral flap ./ 5 9 34 Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a rounded vowel. SUPRASEGMENTALS Z and _ Affricates and double articulations can be represented by two symbols joined by a tie bar if necessary. ( C;<<>X Lè DIACRITICS Diacritics may be placed above a symbol with a descender, e.g. !" !# <u <v Primary stress Secondary stress Long #T-8J!">6Z!J : ( !!$ <<ì !ñ !!) !!+ !!, !!<¢ Jê<<<<?ê Xì<<> ì >ñ<?ñ 2ô 2ú )û +† +¢ <<ë !!& !!( <ö < < ! !. Breathy voiced Creaky voiced Linguolabial Labialized Palatalized =ë<<3ë =î<<3î > ó<< ?ó >ö<?ö > <<? > <? > <? !!% !!' ò !!* <ù !ü !° !!!!! > í<?í Apical > ï<?ï Laminal > ò<?ò Nasalized +õ Nasal release ?ù Lateral release ?ü No audible release ?° Dental << ! w Half-long Extra-short +u +v +w ˆ ( Minor (foot) group Major (intonation) group <x Syllable break i$x9C> Linking (absence of a break) TONES AND WORD ACCENTS LEVEL CONTOUR Extra Rising -N or high Falling High rising Thematic relations: who did what to whom Agent John snores frequently. Theme Agent The turtle was kicked (by Mario) Tuesday, September 28, 2010 SAQ 3.3 McGurk video: http://media.depts.washington.edu/ilabsts/McGurk.wmv Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Extra credit: A production system model of childrens’ seriation Cogst 1101 submit to: David Lutz [email protected] Extra credit due: 11pm October 1st Note: If you haven’t already worked through the Prolog introduction from last week, and you aren’t familiar with Prolog, you should do that activity before attempting this assignment. 1 Prolog as a production system We’ve now seen the basics of what Prolog can do and how it works. In this assignment, we’ll see how we can use Prolog to model a production system, which is itself a way that cognitive scientists like Allen Newell, who we saw on the first day of class, model human cognition.1 Since you’re now familiar with some of the basic concepts of Prolog, the idea of a production rule will quite familiar. A production rule is an if-then rule, which says that if certain conditions hold then do some actions. If a rule’s conditions are satisfied it is said to be triggered, and it may fire, executing its actions. A collection of production rules, coupled with a method of deciding which triggered rule should fire in a given circumstance, is called a production system. You may have noticed that rules in Prolog are similar to production rules, though Prolog terminology Tuesday, September 28, 2010 does not evoke the sort of dynamism that production rules do. (Luger makes the distinction between Extra credit: A production system model of childrens’ seriation Cogst 1101 submit to: David Lutz [email protected] Extra credit due: 11pm October 1st =this Friday last week, Note: If you haven’t already worked through the Prolog introduction from and you aren’t familiar with Prolog, you should do that activity before attempting this assignment. 1 Prolog as a production system We’ve now seen the basics of what Prolog can do and how it works. In this assignment, we’ll see how we can use Prolog to model a production system, which is itself a way that cognitive scientists like Allen Newell, who we saw on the first day of class, model human cognition.1 Since you’re now familiar with some of the basic concepts of Prolog, the idea of a production rule will quite familiar. A production rule is an if-then rule, which says that if certain conditions hold then do some actions. If a rule’s conditions are satisfied it is said to be triggered, and it may fire, executing its actions. A collection of production rules, coupled with a method of deciding which triggered rule should fire in a given circumstance, is called a production system. You may have noticed that rules in Prolog are similar to production rules, though Prolog terminology Tuesday, September 28, 2010 does not evoke the sort of dynamism that production rules do. (Luger makes the distinction between Cheating is not worth it Cornell Code of Academic Integrity I. GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS A.Specific Guidelines for Courses 1.Examinations. During in-class examinations no student may use, give, or receive any assistance or information not given in the examination or by the proctor. No student may take an examination for another student. The student is responsible for understanding the conditions under which the examination will be taken. Tuesday, September 28, 2010 Test Errata Q5,19,30 a/b/c/d are missing use the obvious order Tuesday, September 28, 2010 ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course COGST 1101 taught by Professor Spivey,m during the Fall '07 term at Cornell.

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