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Homework+05+Key

Homework+05+Key - Linguistics 1 Homework#5 Key Part One...

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Linguistics 1 Homework #5 Key Part One From the textbook, do exercises 8(A-G only) and 9 from Chapter 5 . A. The (a) and (b) words are “animate” and “masculine” or [+animate], [+male]. The (a) words are “human” ([+human]). The (b) words are “nonhuman” ([–human]). Linguistics 1 B. The (a) words are count nouns, i.e., nouns whose possible referents are conceptualized as individuated “things”. The (b) words are mass nouns, i.e., nouns whose possible referents are conceptualized as “stuff”, the constituents of which are not individuated. C. The (a) words are “concrete” ([–abstract]). The (b) words are “abstract” ([+abstract]). D. The (a) and (b) words are nouns referring to plants. The (a) words are nouns referring to trees. The (b) words nouns referring to flowers. E. The (a) words are nouns referring to writing containers, i.e., things on or in which writing is found. The (b) words are nouns referring to writing instruments. F. The (a) and (b) words designate “motion” activities. The (a) words designate non-vehicular motion activities. The (b) words designate vehicular motion activities. G. The (a) and (b) words designate communicative activities. The (a) words indicate the purpose of communication. The (b) words indicate the manner of communication. 9. acronym (word derived from the initial letters of a multi-word expression ; NASA, NATO, and radar are acronyms); anacronym (an acronym for which the meaning is not widely known, such as UNIX and radar ); eponym (the name of a name-giver for a people, place, or institution: Constantine is the eponym for the city Constantinople); heteronym (word having the same spelling as another but a different pronunciation and meaning; lead , a kind of metal, and lead , the activity of a leader, are heteronyms); retronym (a word or expression that is coined to refer to what was the original meaning of a word that has developed more than one meaning; snail mail , land-line phone, whole milk , and analog clock are retronyms occasioned by the respective inventions of e-mail, cell phones, low-fat milk, and digital clocks); hyponym (a word that refers to something that is wholly included in the possible referents of another word; scarlet and car are hyponyms of red and vehicle respectively); hypernym (the opposite of a hyponym; red and vehicle are hypernyms of scarlet and car respectively); protonym (the original referent of word
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Linguistics 1 whose meaning is extended to include something else; the spam in my junk mail folder is more unsavory than its protonym, i.e., the canned meat product); paranym (euphemistic word or
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