18 - For any set of tables, there is a single Form, and it...

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For any set of tables, there is a single Form, and it is in virtue of some relationship to that Form that they are all made to be tables. That is, it is the Form of Table that makes something a table. a We are now in a position to see why Aristotle called this an argument for the Forms. The only thing we have seen so far that even looks like an argument would go like this: a. a , b , and c are all tables (i.e., things to which we apply the name “table”). b. Therefore, there is a Form (the Table Itself) that a , b , and c all share in; and it is by virtue of sharing in this Form that they are all tables. The argument moves from a premise asserting the existence of a plurality of things that have something in common to a conclusion that asserts the existence of something else . But what is this something else? One might suggest: it is some feature that they all have in common. But this seems too weak; for it’s already asserted in the premise that they all have something in common:
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHYSICS 110 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at UC Davis.

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18 - For any set of tables, there is a single Form, and it...

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