30 - 1. Larger and smaller particles Since equilateral t...

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Unformatted text preview: 1. Larger and smaller particles Since equilateral t riangles can be constructed out of a s (and squares out of b s) in more than one way, it is possible to have molecules of each of the elements that have different numbers of atomic triangles ( a s and b s). These might be considered isotopes of the basic molecules described by Plato (with each t made of 6 a s, and each s made of 4 b s). An equilateral t riangle can also be constructed out of 2, or 8, or 18, a s (and so on, ad infinitum). A square can also be constructed out of 2, or 8, or 16, b s (and so on, ad infinitum). This means that one normal particle of earth (6 s = 24 b ) can be transformed into 2 of the smaller isotopes of earth (6 s = 12 b ) Similarly, 4 normal particles of water (containing 120 a s each) can combine to form one huge particle of one of the larger isotopes of water (20 sides of 24 a s each, for 480 a s altogether). Final Reflections Comparison with predecessors Platos theory combines elements of the views of many of his predecessors. 1. Pythagoras Like Pythagoras, he made the physical universe fundamentally mathematical. But whereas Pythagoras thought that everything was made of numbers, Plato made geometrical figures - ultimately, t riangles - the atoms of his system....
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30 - 1. Larger and smaller particles Since equilateral t...

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