40 - 1. The answer to all three questions is the same: a...

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1. The answer to all three questions is the same: “a tiger.” It is in this sense that these three causes coincide. 2. Aristotle’s account of animal reproduction makes use of just these points (cf. GA I.21, II.9 and Metaph . Z.7-9): a. The basic idea (as in all change) is that matter takes on form. The form is contributed by the male parent (which actually does have the form), the matter by the female parent. This matter has the potentiality to be informed by precisely that form. b. The embryonic substance has the form potentially, and can be “called by the same name” as what produces it. (E.g., the embryonic tiger can be called a tiger , for that is what it is, potentially at least.) [But there are exceptions: the embryonic mule cannot be called by the name of its male parent, for that is a horse (1034b3).] c. The form does not come into existence. Rather, it must exist beforehand, and get imposed on appropriate matter. In the case of the production of artifacts, the pre- existing form may exist merely potentially. (E.g., the artist has
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40 - 1. The answer to all three questions is the same: a...

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