143 - Forms As Objects Of Knowledge Rep 476-480 1 Overview...

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Forms As Objects Of Knowledge: Rep . 476-480 1. Overview a. Plato begins with two simple premises: Knowledge is of what is. Knowledge is infallible. b. He then moves on to conclusions about what is, or being. c. Thus Plato bases metaphysical (ontological) conclusions on epistemological premises. Epistemological Side Ontological Side Knowledge Being (= what is) Infallibility ? d. Plato is looking for the feature of what is that accounts for the fact that knowledge can’t be mistaken. The infallibility of knowledge is a feature (on the epistemological side) that must be matched (accounted for?) by some feature on the metaphysical side. e. Plato tries to find this feature by considering a state of mind which is like knowledge but is not infallible: belief, or opinion ( doxa ). f. What accounts for the errors that belief (opinion) is prone to? What accounts for mistakes in judgment? Plato’s answer: The cognitive unreliability of the objects of belief. That is, our judgments are unreliable because and in so far as the things our
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143 - Forms As Objects Of Knowledge Rep 476-480 1 Overview...

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