6 - A t any rate, by the end of Section 20, we are told...

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At any rate, by the end of Section 20, we are told that categories are conditions for the unity of all intuition. The conclusion of Section 20 seems to imply the conclusion of Section 26. If what is manifold in a given intuition is subject to the categories, it would seem that "all the objects of our senses" (B145) or "everything that can be presented to our senses" (B160) are subject to the categories, as Section 26 states. Yet Kant states that the conclusion of Section 20 only makes a "beginning" of the argument which culminates in Section 26. Kant scholars have tended not to take Kant at his word on this point. They have thought of the two arguments as different ways of reaching the same conclusion. One way of distinguishing the two is to describe the argument in Section 20 as being "from above," and that of Section 26 as being "from below." The argument from above starts with the unity of apperception and shows how it is a necessary condition for the unity of intuition, while that from below begins with intuitions and works its way up to the categories. Another way of describing the two arguments is as "objective" and "subjective," respectively. In the argument at Section 20, Kant seeks to establish that categories are a necessary
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 113 taught by Professor Gerogemattey during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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6 - A t any rate, by the end of Section 20, we are told...

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