15 - Critique of Pure Reason Lecture notes Analytic and...

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Critique of Pure Reason Lecture notes, January 13, 1997: Analytic and Synthetic Judgments G. J. Mattey The two elements of human cognition are intuition and concept, which are respectively ways of representing things as particulars and general characteristics of things. Concepts, in turn, are of two sorts. They may be generated through abstraction from experienced things, as when a number of things are intuited, and a common characteristic is recognized as being shared by them. Such concepts are empirical . The second sort of concept originates with the mind itself. These pure concepts are the product of the human understanding, which accordingly is said to have spontaneity . This distinction between experiential and original representations might be extended to sensibility , the faculty of intuition. Kant recognized that the human mind is affected by objects in the course of experience, resulting in empirical intuition. Is the mind also spontaneous with respect to intuitions? Kant answers in the negative, so far as the
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15 - Critique of Pure Reason Lecture notes Analytic and...

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