27 - The Cosmological Argument In the Fourth Antinomy Kant had presented an argument(for the Thesis that there is a necessary being as a condition

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The Cosmological Argument In the Fourth Antinomy, Kant had presented an argument (for the Thesis) that there is a necessary being as a condition for the existence of the contingent things found in experience. The argument, however, was found to be fallacious (though the Antithesis, that there is only contingency in the empirical world, was found sound). Nonetheless, there remains the option of going outside experience in search of a necessary being to serve as the ground of all empirical objects in general. "To think an intelligible ground of appearances, that is, of the sensible world, and to think as free from the contingency of appearances, does not conflict either with the unlimited empirical regress in the series of appearances nor with their thoroughgoing conntingency" (A563/B591). This intelligible cause would be "the purely transcendental and to us unknown ground of the possibility of the sensible series in general" (A564/B592). Thus although it is thinkable, such a necessary being is unknown and its existence cannot be proved. This puts the cosmological
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 113 taught by Professor Gerogemattey during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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27 - The Cosmological Argument In the Fourth Antinomy Kant had presented an argument(for the Thesis that there is a necessary being as a condition

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