Eating - of food and the refusal to maintain a minimal,...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Eating Disorders Eating disorders are characterized by severe disturbances in eating behavior. The practice of an eating disorder can be viewed as a survival mechanism. Just as an alcoholic uses alcohol to cope, a person with an eating disorder can use eating, purging or restricting to deal with their problems. Some of the underlying issues that are associated with an eating disorder include low self esteem, depression, feelings of loss of control, feelings of worthlessness, identity concerns, family communication problems and an inability to cope with emotions. The practice of an eating disorder like Anorexia, Bulemia or Compulsive Overeating may be an expression of something that the eating disordered individual has found no other way of expressing. Eating disorders are usually divided into three categories: Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa and Compulsive Overeating. Anorexia Nervosa Anorexia is an eating disorder where the main characteristic is the restriction
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: of food and the refusal to maintain a minimal, normal body weight. Any actual gain or even perceived gain of weight is met with intense fear by the Anorexic. Not only is there a true feeling of fear, but also once in the grasp of the disorder, Anorexics experience body image distortions. Those areas of the body usually representing maturity or sexuality including the buttocks, hips, thighs and breast are visualized by the Anorexic as being fat. For some Anorexics, weight loss is so severe there is a loss of menses (failure to menstruate.) In the obsessive pursuit of thinness, Anorexics participate in restrictive dieting, compulsive exercise, and laxative and diuretic abuse. If Anorexia Nervosa is left untreated, it can be fatal. Halgin, R. P. & Whitbourne, S. K. (2003). Abnormal psychology clinical perspectives on psychological disorders. (5th ed). Boston: McGraw-Hill Publishers....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 67125 taught by Professor Drghazal during the Spring '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online