12 - a. Unfortunately, both alternatives lead to...

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a. Unfortunately, both alternatives lead to unintuitive consequences. i. The problem with alternative (i) is that it requires Theseus to have changed ships during the voyage. For he ends up on B, which is clearly not identical to C. But Theseus never once got off his ship during its entire voyage: Theseus got on board a ship (A), sailed a voyage during which he never got off the ship, and arrived at his destination in a ship (B). He was on just one ship during the whole process, but alternative (i) seems to require that he was on (at least!) two different ships. ii. The problem with alternative (ii) is that in holding that A = B and admitting (as it must) that B C , it must also hold that A C . Yet every part of A is a part of C, and every part of C is a part of A! So A and C are two different ships even though their parts are the same; and what of A and B? They have no parts in common, and yet A and B are the same ship . These results seem as paradoxical as the view that there are no persisting objects.
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 101 taught by Professor Markelwin during the Summer '09 term at UC Davis.

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12 - a. Unfortunately, both alternatives lead to...

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