1 - Wittgenstein In our investigation of our knowledge of...

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Wittgenstein In our investigation of our knowledge of reality, and specifically the ultimate reality sought in metaphysics, we have discovered several different proposals for how we can gain knowledge of metaphysical truths. The first was rational intuition, endorsed by Plato and Descartes, but rejected by Hume and Kant. The second was inference to the unconditioned, the procedure endorsed by Aristotle. Hume and Kant agreed that we cannot know what lies beyond the realm of experience merely by trying to complete the series we find in experience. The third approach was analytical. Through the examination of pure concepts, we can gain significant knowledge of things. According to KantÆs predecessor Wolff, there are two principles of metaphysical knowledge. The principle of non-contradiction says that what contains a contradiction is impossible and cannot exist. A square circle would be an example. The principle of sufficient reason states that whatever exists does so because there is a reason sufficient to bring about its existence. Wolff thought that if such a reason did not exist, a
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 102 taught by Professor Markelwin during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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1 - Wittgenstein In our investigation of our knowledge of...

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