2 - Thus if there are going to be values, they must lie...

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Thus if there are going to be values, they must lie outside the world. Kant had located these values in a "self in itself," a rational being lying outside the world of appearances in space and time. Although he could not prove, the existence of this self, as it transcends experience, he could at least suppose it, since it does not violate the principle of non-contradiction. On WittgensteinÆs view, the "metaphysical subject" is nothing rational, for all reasoning concerns the world, and the metaphysical subject is the "limit" of the world. It is like the eye in the visual field, which sees things but does not cast its gaze upon itself. Ethical concerns have to do with nothing in the world, but rather affect the view of the world itself. This view cannot be expressed in language, which is confined to the description of what is in the world. In the end, it is a mystery. WittgensteinÆs apparent attempt to say what cannot be said is futile, and he ended his essay saying that his propositions are like a ladder which can be kicked away when it has gotten us where we want to go. Eventually Wittgenstein became dissatisfied with his early views, and in the
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 102 taught by Professor Markelwin during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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2 - Thus if there are going to be values, they must lie...

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