33 - The thrust of the remainder of the dialogue is that...

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Unformatted text preview: The thrust of the remainder of the dialogue is that being pleasing to the gods is not sufficient for an acts being pious. If the gods are pleased, it must be for a reason. Now the reason might be found in the effect that the pious act has on the gods. Perhaps it supplies some need the person has. Water is pleasing to someone thirsty because it satisfies the thirst. But the gods want for nothing. There is no instrumental value in the pious acts. If they are to pleased by the pious act, it can only be because of the intrinsic value of the act itself. (A value is intrinsic when it is wholly internal to the valued thing, and instrumental when it depends on a relation to some other thing.) Platos ultimate answer to the question of what makes a pious act pious is to say that there is a form, piety itself, by virtue of which a pious act is pious. Another example might be helpful. An 18-year-old man is scheduled to be punished in Singapore by flogging, for his admitted guilt in vandalizing cars by spray-painting them. People have held that this is flogging, for his admitted guilt in vandalizing cars by spray-painting them....
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY 102 taught by Professor Markelwin during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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