DietSelectionEcoregion

- Human adaptations to diet subsistence and ecoregion are due to subtle shifts in allele frequency Hancock et al 89248930 | PNAS | March 2 2010 |

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Human adaptations to diet, subsistence, and ecoregion are due to subtle shifts in allele frequency. Hancock et al 8924–8930 | PNAS | March 2, 2010 | vol. 107 | suppl. 2
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Methods We used genotype data for 61 human populations, including the 52 populations in the Human Genome Diversity Project Panel, 4 HapMap Phase III populations (Luhya, Maasai, Tuscans, and Gujarati) (www.hapmap.org), and 5 additional populations (Vasekela !Kung sampled in South Africa, lowland Amhara from Ethiopia, Naukan Yup’ik and Maritime Chukchee from Siberia,and Australian Aborigines).
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Analysis For each SNP and each environmental variable, we contrasted allele frequencies between the two sets of populations using a Bayesian linear model method that controls for the covariance of allele frequencies between populations due to population history and accounts for differences in sample sizes among populations. The statistic resulting from this method is a Bayes factor (BF), which is a measure of the support for a model in which a SNP allele frequency distribution is dependent on an environmental variable in addition to population structure, relative to a model in which the allele frequency distribution is dependent on population structure alone.
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When available, data from Murdock (43) were used to classify populations according to their main mode of subsistence and dietary specialization. In cases in which Murdock did not have information about a population, we obtained information from the Encyclopedia of World Cultures (44). We classified each population into one of four subsistence categories (foraging, horticultural, agricultural, or pastoral) and into one of three categories based on the main dietary component (cereals; roots and tubers; or fat, meat, or milk). 43. Murdock GP (1967) Ethnographic Atlas
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- Human adaptations to diet subsistence and ecoregion are due to subtle shifts in allele frequency Hancock et al 89248930 | PNAS | March 2 2010 |

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