0324302592_72724

0324302592_72724 - Chapter 16PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY IN...

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Chapter 16—PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY IN OPERATIONS TRUE/FALSE 1. Operations management is concerned with the design, planning, and control of the factors that enable us to provide the product or service outputs of the organization. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 2. The first three aspects of the operations manager's function are to provide customers what they want, when they want it, and at the lowest possible price. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 1 3. Operations managers must make decisions to ensure that the firm’s product or service output happens 1) in the amount demanded, 2) at the right time, 3) with the chosen quality level, and 4) in a manner compatible with the organization’s goals. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 4. The output of manufacturing will always be a physical product-something that can be touched, measured, weighed, or otherwise examined. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 5. H&R Block, Northwest Airlines, McDonald's and Yahoo! are all examples of manufacturing organizations. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 1 6. As a result of time perishability, when service organizations have excess capacity that goes unused, that service capability has been lost forever. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 7. Several of the differences between manufacturing and service stem from the physical nature of the output. Manufacturing can stockpile inventories of finished products in advance of customer demand. Service organizations usually cannot. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 8. Manufacturing capacity is often described as being time perishable. This means that if a manufacturing organization has excess capacity that goes unused, that manufacturing capacity has been lost forever. ANS: F DIF: M OBJ: 1 9. Production and consumption usually occur simultaneously in manufacturing organizations. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 1 10. Quality is easier to assess in manufacturing than in service. 142
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ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 11. It is important that manufacturing plants be near the locations where the product is sold. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 1 12. Productivity is easier to assess in manufactured products. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 1 13. When the product being made takes the form of discrete, individual units, the system is called a continuous-flow system. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 2 14. When the product being made takes the form of discrete, individual units, the system is called a repetitive-production system, assembly-line system, or mass-production system. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 2 15. Another name for a mass-production system is a continuous-flow production system. ANS: F DIF: E OBJ: 2 16. When a product is made in a continuous stream, rather than in discrete units, the system is called a continuous-flow production system. ANS: T DIF: E OBJ: 2 17. A Miller brewery (making beer) is an example of a continuous-flow production system. ANS: T
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This note was uploaded on 01/31/2011 for the course MGMT 302 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '10 term at Mountain State.

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0324302592_72724 - Chapter 16PRODUCTIVITY AND QUALITY IN...

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