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20 Lesson The Self

20 Lesson The Self - The Self ASSIGNMENT LESSON 20 a Read...

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The Self ASSIGNMENT a. Read text Chapter 12 (p. 469-471) and course guide supplemental readings. b. Complete Self-Reflection Worksheet (Self-Assessment and Ideal Self columns). c. Answer IPO 20 LESSON OBJECTIVE 20.1. Discuss the results of cadets’ NEO-PI-R. 20.2. Describe the various processes through which one learns about him/herself. 20.3. Explain how behaviors may be changed based on one’s interactions with the environment. PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES 20-1. Define personality. An individual’s unique constellation of consistent behavioral traits 20-2. Summarize McCrae and Costa’s Five-Factor Model of Personality. Maintains that most personality traits are derived form just five higher-order trains know as the “Big Five”: Extraversion: outgoing, sociable, upbeat, friendly, assertive and gregarious (+ emotionality) Neuroticism: anxious, hostile, self-concious, insecure, and vulnerable (- emotionality) Openness to experience: curiosity, flexibility, vivid fantasy, imaginative, arstisic, unconventional attitudes Aggreeableness: sympathetic, trusting,cooperative, modest, straightforward Conscientiousness : diligent, disciplined, well organized, punctual, dependable 20.3. Describe self-schemas and explain how they affect processing of information related to the self. The collection of beliefs and concepts that we hold about ourselves – the knowledge- based summaries of our feelings, thoughts, and actions – are often referred to as self- schemas. Hazel Markus (1977) argued that people tend to process information that are consistent with their self-schemas more quickly than they can process ones that contradict with their self-schemas. 20-4. Explain how one learns about the self through social comparison. A second way that other people are involved in judgments about the self is that we often compare ourselves to other people. 20 20 L E S S O N
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This process of explicitly comparing ourselves to other people in order to judge the self is called social comparison . The term was coined by Leon Festinger (1954), who proposed that we often rely on comparisons with other people to assess our abilities and our attitudes. Festinger hypothesized that, if possible, we test our abilities or beliefs in an objective, physical way. 20.5 Describe possible consequences of discrepancies among possible selves. The most frequently discussed self-conceptions have been the actual self, how people believe they really are, and the ideal self, how people would ideally like themselves to be. Higgins proposed that when we fail to achieve our ideals (the things we want to be), we experience negative emotion along a dejection dimension. He suggested that this situation is psychologically experienced as the absence of positive things: we do not possess things that we want to possess. We therefore feel unhappy, disappointed, sad, and depressed (negative dejection emotions).
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THE SELF REFLECTION WORKSHEET Reflect on your own personality in terms of the five "domains" of the NEO PI-R model, which are listed below. Complete the Self Assessment Column of the
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