hw5-2010 - Problem 5-4. 10pts 1. 10pts Design an O ( n 2 )...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DFS/BFS, MST, Dynamic Programming November 16, 2010 Homework 5 Due Date: Tuesday, November 30, 2010, 2:05pm Problem 5-1. 10pts Explain how a vertex u of a directed graph can end up in a DFS tree containing only u , even though u has both incoming and outgoing edges in G . [Construct an example and explain why, in your example, u could end up as a single-node tree.] Problem 5-2. 15pts Given a graph G and a minimum spanning tree T , suppose that we decrease the weight of one of the edges in T . Show that T is still a minimum spanning tree of G . Now suppose we increase the weight of one of the edges not in T . Again, show that T is still a minimum spanning tree of G . Problem 5-3. 25pts Prove that a minimum spanning tree of a graph has the property that its heaviest edge weight is minimum over all spanning trees of G . In other words, prove that if your goal is to find a tree that minimizes the weight of the heaviest edge, then MST is one of the possible solutions.
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Problem 5-4. 10pts 1. 10pts Design an O ( n 2 ) algorithm to find the length of the longest monotonically increasing subsequence of a sequence of n numbers. 2. Extra Credit Explain how to modify your algorithm to run in O ( n log n ) time. Problem 5-5. 15pts Design an O ( n 2 ) algorithm to find the length of a longest subsequence that first monotonically increases and then monotonically decreases. For example, if the input sequence is 1 , 7 , 4 , 9 , 5 , 3 , 8 , 7 , 2, then 1 , 4 , 3 , 2 is such a sequence, as well as 7 , 3 , 2 and 1 , 7 , 9. (Note that the second example misses ”increasing” part, and the third is missing the ”decreasing” part.) For this example, the answer is 6: (1, 7, 9, 5, 3, 2) or (1, 7, 9, 8, 7, 2). Problem 5-6. 25pts Solve problem CLRS 15.6, page 408 (Second edition: 15.4, page 367) 1...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course MATH 171 taught by Professor R during the Spring '09 term at Stanford.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online