Histology - Histology Types of tissues and their origins...

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Unformatted text preview: Histology Types of tissues and their origins • 4 basic types – Epithelial tissue – Connective tissue – Muscular tissue – Nervous tissue Types of tissues and their origins • Epithelial tissue – Covers body surfaces – Lines hollow organs, body cavities, and ducts – Forms glands – Internal and external surfaces Types of tissues and their origins • Connective tissue – Protects and supports the body and organs – Diversity in function • Bind organs together • Provides flexibility • Store energy • Provide immunity • Provide structural support Types of tissues and their origins • Muscular tissue – Contraction and generation of force and heat • Nervous tissue – Detect internal and external changes – Generation of nerve impulses – Activates muscle contractions and glandular excretions Cell Junctions • Contact points between two plasma membranes Cell Junctions • Tight junctions – Transmembrane proteins fuse together adjacent cells – Prevent fluids from leaking through cell wall Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning Where would you expect to find tight junctions? Organs holding increased amounts of fluids Cell Junctions • Tight junctions – Transmembrane proteins fuse together adjacent cells – Prevent fluids from leaking through cell wall – Line the stomach , intestine , and urinary bladder Cell Junctions • Adherens junctions – Rows of cadherens (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell – Attach to plaque w/ parallel rows of actin (microfilaments) – Connect to adhesion belt – wraps periphery of cell – Aid epithelial cells in resisting separation Cell Junctions • Desmosomes – Rows of cadherens (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell – Attach to plaque embedded with keratin (intermediate filaments) – Aid epithelial and cardiac cells in resisting separation under tension Cell Junctions • Hemidesmosome – Rows of integrins (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell – Attach to plaque embedded with keratin (intermediate filaments) – Connect to laminin of basement membrane – Anchor cells to basement membrane Cell Junctions • Gap junctions – Connexins form tunnels – Transports ions, small molecules, and fluid Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning Epithelial Tissue • Arranged in sheets • Closely packed • Little intercellular space • Many cell junctions • Always has a apical (free) surface – Serves a barrier – Secretory surface Epithelial Tissue • 4 surfaces – Apical • Lines body cavity, duct, surface, or lumen (interior space of organ) – Basal (basement membrane) • Contain cell junction – Lateral • Contain cell junctions Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning Which cell junctions would be found in the apical, basal, and lateral surfaces of a cell?...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course BIOL 1604 taught by Professor Allen during the Spring '03 term at Tulsa Community College.

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Histology - Histology Types of tissues and their origins...

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