Histology - Histology Types of tissues and their origins 4...

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Histology
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Types of tissues and their origins 4 basic types Epithelial tissue Connective tissue Muscular tissue Nervous tissue
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Types of tissues and their origins Epithelial tissue Covers body surfaces Lines hollow organs, body cavities, and ducts Forms glands Internal and external surfaces
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Types of tissues and their origins Connective tissue Protects and supports the body and organs Diversity in function Bind organs together Provides flexibility Store energy Provide immunity Provide structural support
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Types of tissues and their origins Muscular tissue Contraction and generation of force and heat Nervous tissue Detect internal and external changes Generation of nerve impulses Activates muscle contractions and glandular excretions
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Cell Junctions Contact points between two plasma membranes
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Cell Junctions Tight junctions Transmembrane proteins fuse together adjacent cells Prevent fluids from leaking through cell wall
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Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning Where would you expect to find tight junctions? Organs holding increased amounts of fluids
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Cell Junctions Tight junctions Transmembrane proteins fuse together adjacent cells Prevent fluids from leaking through cell wall Line the stomach , intestine , and urinary bladder
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Cell Junctions Adherens junctions Rows of cadherens (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell Attach to plaque w/ parallel rows of actin (microfilaments) Connect to adhesion belt – wraps periphery of cell Aid epithelial cells in resisting separation
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Cell Junctions Desmosomes Rows of cadherens (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell Attach to plaque embedded with keratin (intermediate filaments) Aid epithelial and cardiac cells in resisting separation under tension
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Cell Junctions Hemidesmosome Rows of integrins (transmembrane glycoproteins) on external surface of epithelial cell Attach to plaque embedded with keratin (intermediate filaments) Connect to laminin of basement membrane Anchor cells to basement membrane
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Cell Junctions Gap junctions Connexins form tunnels Transports ions, small molecules, and fluid
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Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning
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Epithelial Tissue Arranged in sheets Closely packed Little intercellular space Many cell junctions Always has a apical (free) surface Serves a barrier Secretory surface
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Epithelial Tissue 4 surfaces Apical Lines body cavity, duct, surface, or lumen (interior space of organ) Basal (basement membrane) Contain cell junction Lateral Contain cell junctions
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Checkpoint: Collaborative Learning Which cell junctions would be found in the apical, basal, and lateral surfaces of a cell?
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