EE3TP4_11a_CTConvolution_Lecture 13

EE3TP4_11a_CTConvolution_Lecture 13 - Convolution for C-T...

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1/11 Convolution for C-T systems We saw for D-T systems: - Definition of Impulse Response h [ n ] - How TI & Linearity allow us to use h [ n ] to write an equation that gives the output due to input x [ n ] (That equation is Convolution) C-T LTI ICs = 0 δ( t ) h ( t ) t t δ( t ) h ( t ) If system is causal , h ( t ) = 0 for t < 0 The same ideas arise for C-T systems! (And the arguments to get there are very similar … so we won’t go into as much detail!!) Impulse Response : h ( t ) is what “comes out” when δ( t ) “goes in” These overheads were originally developed by Mark Fowler at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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3/11
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4/11
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5/11 In what form will we know h ( t )? Our focus is here 1. h ( t ) known analytically as a function -e.g. h ( t ) = e -2 t u ( t ) 2. We may only have experimentally obtained samples: - h ( nT ) at n = 0, 1, 2, 3, … , N -1 Now we can… Use h ( t ) to find the zero-state response of the system for an input h ( t ) x ( t ) y ( t ) C-T LTI
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course ECE 3TP4 taught by Professor Drterrencetodd during the Fall '10 term at McMaster University.

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EE3TP4_11a_CTConvolution_Lecture 13 - Convolution for C-T...

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