PNR+182+Chapter+2+Medication+Administration+Spring+2010+rhb

PNR+182+Chapter+2+Medication+Administration+Spring+2010+rhb...

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Introductory Clinical Pharmacology PNR 182--  Spring 2010  Administration of Drugs January 12, 2010    Chapter 32 and 33 (Timby) Rhonda Browning BSN, RN
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Introduction to Pharmacology           Not only must the nurse administer the drug  correctly, he/she must also: Monitor the therapeutic response Report adverse reactions Teach the patient and family members 
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Medication orders Medication Order may be written by: Physician Dentist *Physician’s assistant *Advanced practice nurse Must be legally designated by state statutes
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Necessary Components of a Medication Order All medication orders must have  seven  components: 1. Patient’s name 2. Date and time the order was written 3. Drug name 4. Dose to be administered 5. Route of administration  6. Frequency of administration 7. Signature of the person ordering the drug.
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Medication orders –components (cont’d) If any of the 7 components is absent, the drug is withheld until the  missing information can be obtained. A medication order should never be implemented (given) if  the nurse questions any part of the order!!! You should question: Unclear directions for administration Illegible handwriting on the order sheet Drug dose that is higher or lower than the dosages  given in the approved reference drug guide.
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Verbal and Telephone Medication Orders Verbal Order  – instructions for patient care that are given face to  face or over the telephone.   More likely to be misinterpreted than those that are written. Nurse  MUST  repeat/read the order back to the physician and  have him verify it is correct. Doctor  MUST  sign the order within 24 hours.
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Verbal/phone orders (cont’d) Taking telephone orders: Have a second nurse listen simultaneously on an  extension if possible. Record the drug order immediately on the patient’s  record. Read/Repeat the written info back to the prescriber Make sure the order includes the essential components  of a drug order. Clarify any drug names that sound similar, such as 
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