BIPOLAR DISORDERS - BIPOLAR DISORDERS DSM-IV 296.xx Bipolar...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BIPOLAR DISORDERS DSM-IV 296.xx Bipolar I disorder 296.0x Single manic episode 296.40 Most recent episode hypomanic 296.4x Most recent episode manic 296.6x Most recent episode mixed 296.7 Most recent episode unspecified 296.5x Most recent episode depressed 296.89 Bipolar II disorder (recurrent major depressive episodes with hypomania) 301.13 Cyclothymic disorder 296.80 Bipolar disorder NOS Bipolar disorders are characterized by recurrent mood swings of varying degree from depression to  elation with intervening periods of normalcy. Milder mood swings such as cyclothymia may be manifested  or viewed as everyday  creativity rather than an illness requiring treatment. Hypomania can actually  enhance artistic creativity and creative thinking /  problem-solving. This plan of care focuses on treatment of the manic phase. ( Note:  Bipolar II disorder is characterized  by periods of depression and hypomania, but without manic episodes.) Refer to CP: Depressive Disorders  for care of depressive episode. ETIOLOGICAL THEORIES Psychodynamics Psychoanalytical theory explains the cyclic behaviors of mania and depression as a response to  conditional love from the primary caregiver. The child is maintained in a dependent position, and ego  development is disrupted. This gives way to the development of a punitive superego (anger turned inward  or depression) or a strong id (uncontrollable impulsive behavior or mania). In the psychoanalytical model,  mania is viewed as the mirror image of depression, a “denial of depression.” Biological There is increasing evidence to indicate that genetics plays a strong role in the predisposition to  bipolar disorder. Research suggests a combination of genes may create this predisposition. Incidence  among relatives of affected individuals is higher than in the general population. Biochemically there appear  to be increased levels of the biogenic amine norepinephrine in the brain, which may account for the  increased activity of the manic individual. Family Dynamics Object loss theory suggests that depressive illness occurs if the person is separated from or abandoned  by a significant other during the first 6 months of life. The bonding process is interrupted and the child  withdraws from people and the environment. Rejection by parents in childhood or spending formative  years with a family that sees life as hopeless and has a chronic expectation of failure makes it difficult for  the individual to be optimistic. The mother may be distant and unloving, the father a less-powerful person,  and the child expected to achieve high social and academic success. CLIENT ASSESSMENT DATA BASE (MANIC EPISODE)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

BIPOLAR DISORDERS - BIPOLAR DISORDERS DSM-IV 296.xx Bipolar...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online