BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER - BORDERLINE PERSONALITY...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER DSM-IV 301.83 Borderline personality disorder “Borderline” has been used to identify clients who seem to fall on the border between the standard  categories of neuroses or psychoses. The term has been refined to indicate a client with a pervasive pattern  of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, affect, and control over impulses beginning in early  adulthood, and includes such factors as feelings of abandonment, impulsivity, reactivity of mood, chronic  feelings of emptiness, and problems with anger. ETIOLOGICAL THEORIES Psychodynamics Unconscious processes that are believed to shape personality are set in motion by drives or instincts  that are then influenced by conflicts among them as well as instinctual wishes and demands of reality.  Defensive maneuvers are unconsciously developed to protect against anxiety arising from this conflict.  This personality is seen as a painstaking but poorly constructed defense. It is also seen as resulting from a fixation of libido at stages of psychosexual development associated  with certain body parts. Although it is difficult to agree on how personality is formed, severe personality  disorders are believed to begin early in childhood and milder forms are thought to be influenced by factors  during later development. Biological Personality is believed to have a hereditary basis known as “temperament” and biological dispositions  that affect mood and level of activity (e.g., cranky, placid, self-contained, outgoing, impulsive, cautious).  There is little agreement about how this affects the development of personality disorders. Family Dynamics The child’s social environment, particularly that within the family, is assumed to be the main force  that shapes personality. The theory of object relations provides a basis for personality development and an  explanation of the dynamics that manifest the borderline characteristics. The individual with borderline  personality may be fixed in the rapprochement phase of development (18–25 months of age). In this phase,  the   child   is   experiencing   increasing   autonomy,   while   still   requiring   “emotional   refueling”   from   the  mothering figure. Because the mother feels threatened by the child’s efforts at independence, she strives to  keep the child dependent. Nurturing and emotional support become bargaining tools. They are withheld  when the child exhibits independent behaviors and are used as rewards for clinging, dependent behaviors. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 12

BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER - BORDERLINE PERSONALITY...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online