DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMERS TYPE_VASCULAR DEMENTIA

DEMENTIA OF THE - DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMERS TYPE/VASCULAR DEMENTIA DSM-IV DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMERS TYPE(DAT Early Onset(At or Below Age 65

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DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMER’S TYPE/VASCULAR DEMENTIA DSM-IV DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMER’S TYPE (DAT) Early Onset (At or Below Age 65) 290.10 Uncomplicated 290.11 With delirium 290.12 With delusions 290.13 With depressed mood Late Onset (After Age 65) 290.0 Uncomplicated 290.3 With delirium 290.20 With delusions 290.21 With depressed mood (Note: DAT should also be coded on Axis III, 331.0.) VASCULAR DEMENTIA 290.40 Uncomplicated 290.41 With delirium 290.42 With delusions 290.43 With depressed mood Note: In the presence of vascular dementia, the specific underlying medical cause, such as stroke, should be coded on Axis III. (For dementias due to other general medical conditions, refer to DSM-IV for specific code listing.) Dementia of the Alzheimer’s type is a specific degenerative process occurring primarily in the cells  located at the base of the forebrain that send information to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is the  most common form of dementia and is characterized by a steady and global decline. In comparison,  vascular dementia reflects a pattern of intermittent deterioration related to multiple infarcts to various areas  of the brain. Although the etiologies differ, these two forms of dementia share a common symptom  presentation and therapeutic intervention. ETIOLOGICAL THEORIES Psychodynamics These forms of dementia reflect a chronic organic mental disorder with progressive cognitive losses  caused by damage to various areas of the brain, depending on underlying pathology. Personality change is  common and may be manifested by either an alteration or accentuation of premorbid characteristics with  primary deficits in memory and planning and a predisposition to confusion. Biological Theories Vascular dementia reflects a pattern of intermittent deterioration in the brain. Symptoms fluctuate and  are determined by the area of the brain that is affected. Deterioration is thought to occur in response to  repeated   infarcts   of   the   brain.   Predisposing   factors   include   cerebral   and   systemic   vascular   disease,  hypertension, cerebral hypoxia, hypoglycemia, cerebral embolism, and severe head injury.
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Several studies have shown that antibodies are produced in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s  disease.   Although   the   triggering   mechanism   is   not   known,   the   reactions   are   actually   autoantibody  production, suggesting a possible alteration in the body’s immune system. Although the exact cause of  Alzheimer’s disease is unknown, several hypotheses have been supported by varying amounts and quality  of research data. The exception is research on environmental causes, such as the ingestion of aluminum,  which to date have not been supported by research findings. Research has revealed that, in DAT, the 
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course PNR 182 taught by Professor Toole during the Spring '10 term at Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College.

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DEMENTIA OF THE - DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMERS TYPE/VASCULAR DEMENTIA DSM-IV DEMENTIA OF THE ALZHEIMERS TYPE(DAT Early Onset(At or Below Age 65

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