HALLUCINOGEN PHENCYCLIDINE AND CANNABIS_RELATED DISORDERS

HALLUCINOGEN PHENCYCLIDINE AND CANNABIS_RELATED DISORDERS -...

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HALLUCINOGEN-,PHENCYCLIDINE-, AND CANNABIS-RELATED DISORDERS DSM-IV HALLUCINOGEN-RELATED/INDUCED DISORDERS 292.89 Hallucinogen intoxication 292.81 Intoxication delirium 292.89 Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (flashbacks) 292.89 Hallucinogen-induced anxiety disorder 292.84 Hallucinogen-induced mood disorder PHENCYCLIDINE (OR PHENCYCLIDINE-LIKE)/INDUCED DISORDERS 292.89 Phencyclidine intoxication 292.81 Intoxication delirium 292.11 Induced psychotic disorder with delusions 292.12 Induced psychotic disorder with hallucinations CANNABIS-RELATED/INDUCED DISORDERS 292.89 Cannabis intoxication 292.81 Intoxication delirium 292.89 Cannabis-induced anxiety disorder Hallucinogenic   substances   can   distort   an   individual’s   perception   of   reality,   altering   sensory  perception,   and   inducing   hallucinations.   For   this   reason,   these   substances   are   referred   to   as   “mind  expanding.” They are highly unpredictable in the effects they may induce each time they are used, and  adverse reactions, including “flashbacks,” can recur at any time, even without current use of the drug.  Hallucinogens have been used as part of religious ceremonies and at social gatherings by Native Americans  for more than 2000 years. Therapeutic uses for LSD have been proposed; however, more research is  required. At this time, no real evidence speaks to the safety and efficacy of LSD in humans. Of   the   drugs   that   produce   mood   and   perceptual   changes   varying   from   sensory   illusions   to  hallucinations, the most popular and well-known are ergot and related compounds (LSD, morning glory  seeds), phenyl alkylamines (mescaline, “STP,” and MDMA or “Ecstasy”), and indole alkaloids (DMT). A separate classification of drugs includes phencyclidine (PCP, “angel dust,” HOG) and similarly  acting   compounds   such   as   ketamine   (Ketalar)   and   the   thiophene   analogue   of  phencyclidine   (TCP).  Although these drugs have an entirely different chemical structure, they can have similar hallucinogenic  effects and therefore are included here. Additionally,   cannabis   (marijuana,   hashish,   synthetic   THC)   also   produces   an   altered   state   of  awareness accompanied by feelings of relaxation and mild euphoria and is often used in conjunction with  other substances. This plan of care addresses acute intoxication / withdrawal and is to be used in conjunction with CP:  Substance Dependence / Abuse Rehabilitation.
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HALLUCINOGEN PHENCYCLIDINE AND CANNABIS_RELATED DISORDERS -...

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