IMFs - + end of an adjacent highly polar molecule, but...

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IMFs in Covalent Compounds Dipole-dipole IMFs These are the dominant attractive forces that hold together groups of polar covalent molecules. They arise because the δ - end of one polar molecule is attracted to the + end of an adjacent polar molecule. Hydrogen-bonding IMFs These are the dominant attractive forces that hold together groups of highly polar covalent molecules. Such molecules will contain at least one highly polar bond, typically a H atom (with a very low X ) directly bonded to either a F, O or N atom (with very high X ). Like dipole-dipole IMFs, they arise because the - end of one highly polar molecule is attracted to the
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Unformatted text preview: + end of an adjacent highly polar molecule, but hydrogen-bonding IMFs are much stronger attractive forces. London dispersion IMFs London dispersion forces are found to some degree in all covalent substances, however, they are the only attractive forces that hold together groups of non-polar covalent molecules. At any given instant in time, non-polar molecules can become slightly polar due to the random motion of their electrons into non-symmetrical arrangements, and thus they can acquire an instantaneous dipole moment. This gives rise to the weak attractions that exist between non-polar molecules....
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