INvasive ES_10_Lecture

INvasive ES_10_Lecture - Invasive Plants on Mount Tamalpais...

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Invasive Plants on Mount Tamalpais Shannon Fiala, ES 10 11.30.09
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Invasive Plants on Mount Tamalpais • Invasive plants in the context of biodiversity • Invasive plants around Strawberry Creek Impacts of Invasive Plants -Specifically how they threaten rare plant populations on the Marin Municipal Water District’s Mount Tamalpais watershed My experience battling invasive plants on Mount Tamalpais Mount Tamalpais as seen from Berkeley
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Where is Mount Tamalpais?
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What is the Marin Municipal Water District? • Provides drinking water for Marin County from rainfall runoff flowing to reservoirs on what formerly was Lagunitas Creek • Manages 21,000 acres of land, including 18,500 in the Mt. Tamalpais Watershed and 2,750 acres adjacent to the Nicasio and Soulajule reservoirs in west Marin. • Community outreach: Promotes water conservation measures and strives to protect the biodiversity of the watershed www.marinwater.org
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Biodiversity on Mount Tamalpais Wide variety of habitats High species richness! Endemic species adapted to serpentine soils Several rare and endangered plant and animal species, which in the absence of habitat loss, are threatened primarily by invasive non-native plants
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• Plants that evolved in one region of the globe that have been moved by humans to another region, which flourish in the absence of natural predators and diseases, and can quickly spread out of control • Many invasive species form monocultures that push out native species and reduce food and shelter needed by native wildlife, including endangered species. Information taken from California Invasive Plant Council (www.cal-ipc.org)
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INvasive ES_10_Lecture - Invasive Plants on Mount Tamalpais...

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