09_16_SustAg - New Ruralism: Revitalizing Regional Food and...

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New Ruralism: Revitalizing Regional Food and Agriculture Systems Sibella Kraus, Director Sustainable Agriculture Education (SAGE) Agriculture at the Metropolitan Edge Program (AMR), UC Berkeley Association of Environmental Planners (AEP) Conference March 17, 2009
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Vision: New Ruralism is the preservation and enhancement of urban influenced rural areas as places that are indispensable to the economic, environmental, and cultural vitality of cities and metropolitan regions. What is New Ruralism? • Systems-based and place-based framework • Bridges sustainable agriculture/local food systems and Smart Growth/New Urbanism
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New Ruralism Attributes Draws from but does not romanticize past models Precedents Foodbelts and permanent agricultural preserves Form Viable farm businesses, fair and safe labor conditions, and affordable local food Economic viability and equity Integration of farms and habitat; incentives for environmental services and resource conservation Stewardship of natural resources Opportunities for recreation, education, and diverse public enjoyment of rural lifestyle Public engagement Options for retiring farmers and opportunities for new farmers Living agricultural traditions Landscape, artisan foods help convey sense of place, for urban-rural metropolitan regions Place-making Rural lands within urban influence Geography
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Agricultural Transect from Rural to Urban Characteristics • Intensive production • Agritourism • Natural resource values • Rural live-style • Recreation amenity • Agricultural education • Community building • Industrial ’big’ agriculture – Commodity focus – Environmental compliance only – Independent from urban life • Family farming – Diversified economics – Interdependent with rural community • Urban agriculture – Strong social engagement What is agriculture?
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Agriculture Typology Many types of agriculture, farms, and farmers Acreage scale: small, medium, large Income scale: small, medium, large Tenure: family-owned, corporate ‘Public’ types: educational farm, historic farm, allotment, farmer-incubator project, AgPark, conservancy USDA farmer definitions: experienced, beginning Fairview Garden, Goleta Star Route Farm, Bolinas Ardenwood Historic Farm
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2011 for the course ES 10 taught by Professor Kondolf during the Spring '09 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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09_16_SustAg - New Ruralism: Revitalizing Regional Food and...

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