Lecture1 - Lecture 1: Getting Started with PHY329 How do...

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Lecture 1: Getting Started with PHY329 How do you get in touch with me: Gennady Shvets, RLM 11.216 (T,TH 5-6pm or by appointment) E-mail: gena@physics.utexas.edu Phone: 471-7371 How do you get in touch with your TA: James McIlhargey, RLM 11.217 (M 4-5pm, F 3-4pm or by appointment) E-mail: jgm532@gmail.com
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Getting Started with PHY329: Blackboard How I get in touch with you: Blackboard: courses.utexas.edu If you are registered for the course: you are already enrolled in the Blackboard If not: send me your EID/LastName/Email, and I will enroll you. What will be posted there: All my lecture notes (not necessary for you to take notes, especially because it is hard to copy computer code lines fast enough), MATLAB tutorials, Numerical Recipes chapters,… All homeworks: 7 all together, although 2 offered as in-class Practicums (see the tentative schedule) Occasional e-mails from me and from your TA
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Getting Started with PHY329: Blackboard What will you be posting on the Blackboard: You will be dropping your homework solutions as zipped files into a Digital DropBox. The zipped file names should have the format Smith_5.zip, where Smith is the last name, 5 is the assignment number Your assignments will be due Tuesdays before the start of the class. Depending on the complexity of the assignment, you will have one or two weeks to prepare it. My intention is to have the last homework due on April 28 to give you enough time to work on your Term Paper.
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What is this course about? This is NOT a course on computer programming! You should all be familiar with the basics of computer programming using SOME programming language, be it C++, Python, FORTRAN, Java, MATLAB, C, whatever. There is a formal CS303E pre-requisite (which is often Python-based, but it depends on the instructor), but I am not insisting on it as long as you have some programming experience. We will be using MATLAB (Matrix Laboratory). MATLAB was created in the late 1970s by Cleve Moler, the chairman of the computer science department at the UNM. He designed it to give his students access to LINPACK (linear algebra) and EISPACK (eigenvectors and eigenvalues) without having to learn Fortran. MathWorks: founded in 1984, continues to develop MATLAB. Use whatever OS you like: Linux/Unix, MS Windows, MacOS
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You will be comfortable with: (i) analyzing data on the computer (such as doing polynomial fits and least squares approximations), (ii) presenting your results in a graphical form (2 and 3-d plots), (iii)solving nonlinear algebraic equations, (iv) integrating complicated functions (including the ones defined
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Lecture1 - Lecture 1: Getting Started with PHY329 How do...

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