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Harmonic_Motion - HARMONIC MOTION Objective Equipment To...

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HARMONIC MOTION Objective To measure the force constant of a spring, and the period of oscillation for differing masses, and verify the theoretical result Equipment timer, spring, weights and weight hanger, stand, pendulum clamp, 2-meter stick Introduction A spring in its relaxed state is not being compressed or stretched. If the spring is subjected to a force that displaces it from its relaxed state, the spring will exert a force to oppose that displacement. If it is compressed, it will push back. If stretched, it will pull back. The force exerted by the spring is referred to as the “restoring force”. The restoring force is proportional to the degree of displacement and is in the opposite direction of the displacement. The proportionality constant, k, is called the force constant. This relationship is known as Hooke’s Law and is shown by the equation F= -kx (1) where F is the force being exerted on the spring and x is the extension of the spring beyond its equilibrium point. A mass suspended from a spring and set into motion will oscillate undergoing simple harmonic motion.
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