107_notes03

107_notes03 - MAE107 Introduction of Modeling and Analysis...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: MAE107 Introduction of Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems Lecture Notes #3 Prof. MCloskey More on transfer functions, solutions to IVPs with inputs of the form u ( t ) = e st Block diagram manipulation Textbook reading: 1. Section 8.9 introduces transfer functions as a means of describing the particular solutions of linear ODEs when the input is of exponential form, i.e. u ( t ) = e st for s C . 2. The introduction to Chapter 14, 14.1 and 14.2 give more detail on transfer func- tions. Transfer functions, poles, and zeros Recall the n th order linear, time-invariant ODE d n dt n ( x ( t ))+ a 1 d n- 1 dt n- 1 ( x ( t )) + + a n- 1 d dt ( x ( t )) + a n x ( t ) = b 1 d n- 1 dt n- 1 ( u ( t )) + + b n- 1 d dt ( u ( t )) + b n u ( t ) , (1) The transfer function was motivated by consider inputs of the form u ( t ) = e st , s C . (2) By assuming a particular solution of the form x p ( t ) = ce st , where c C is to be determined, we found c = b 1 s n- 1 + b 2 s n- 2 + + b n- 1 s + b n s n + a 1 s n- 1 + a 2 s n- 2 + + a n- 1 s + a n . (3) when s is not equal to a characteristic root. This is the systems transfer function and it has greater significance beyond what we have demonstrated so far (more detail when we discuss Laplace transforms). Note that the condition that s not be equal to a characteristic root is only so that the assumed form of the particular solution actually satisfies the ODE, and in this case the particular solution is merely a scaled version of the input (the scaling factor being the transfer function value at s ). On the other hand, if s is equal to a characteristic root, then the particular solution is not of the assumed form, however, a unique solution to the IVP still exists of course. The transfer function can be denoted in several ways: 1. when it is useful to note the input function and the dependent variable explicitly, the transfer function can be denoted x/u or x u , where x and u represent the dependent variable and input function, respectively. 2. when a transfer function is shown in a block diagram it is useful to give it a generic symbol like H , G , P , etc. For example, 1- u H- y If we treat the transfer function as a ratio of polynomials, then we see that the denomi- nator polynomial is actually the characteristic polynomial of the ODE whose roots (the characteristic roots) determine the nature of the homogeneous solutions of the ODE. There are two important definitions pertaining to the denominator and numerator poly- nomials: 1. Poles: The poles of a transfer function are the roots of s n + a 1 s n- 1 + a 2 s n- 2 + + a n- 1 s + a n ....
View Full Document

Page1 / 15

107_notes03 - MAE107 Introduction of Modeling and Analysis...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online