RGS6036.E1.ex2.4

RGS6036.E1.ex2.4 - Name Exercise Number 2.4 Exercise Theory Title Deontological Theory 1-Theory Description Frankena explains that deontological

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Name: Exercise Number: 2.4 Exercise Theory Title: Deontological Theory 1-Theory Description Frankena explains that deontological theories “deny that the right, the obligatory, and the morally good are wholly, whether directly or indirectly, a function of what is nonmorally good or of what promotes the greatest balance of good over evil for self, one’s society, or the world as a whole (Frankena, 1973, 15).” Essentially, this theory claims that there are features within the actions themselves which determine whether or not they are right. Deontological theories concentrate on the act being performed instead of focusing on the consequences (as teleological theories). The word deontology comes from the Greek roots deon, which means duty, and logos, which means science. Thus, deontology is the "science of duty." The deontological theory is characterized by a focus upon adherence to independent moral rules or duties. As Cline explains it, to make the correct moral choices, we have to understand what our moral duties are and what
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2011 for the course BUS 6036 taught by Professor Ivanov during the Spring '11 term at Dallas.

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RGS6036.E1.ex2.4 - Name Exercise Number 2.4 Exercise Theory Title Deontological Theory 1-Theory Description Frankena explains that deontological

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