RGS6036.E1EX3

RGS6036.E1EX3 - Name Course RGS6036.E1 EXERCISE 3 THE MEANING OF ETHICS 1 Describe mind tyrants and explain their significance to the study of

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Name: Course: RGS6036.E1 EXERCISE 3 THE MEANING OF ETHICS 1. Describe mind tyrants and explain their significance to the study of ethics. Identify two original examples of mind tyrants. Mind tyrants are influential factors that may influence our behaviors, ways of thinking, values or any other aspects related. Such factors include different features such as customs, tradition or social norms. For example, in some parts of the world (such as Ivory Coast) it is proper to offer gifts while doing business. It is a custom to bring a gift when meeting someone for an important gathering. In other parts, such act may be considered unethical since it may be viewed as a bribe. An individual should manage his own thoughts and choose his/her own values that are not completely influenced by those mind tyrants. Let’s consider another example. In some countries, a woman is not allowed to shake a man’s hand due to different religious influences. While this may seem proper in those countries, it may engender major consequences in other environments. The awareness of mind tyrants plays an important role in the study of ethics because it helps us identify what acts may be wrong facing different situation. Having a better knowledge of those influential factors can help us in making the right ethical decisions and promoting mental freedom. 2. Referring to the story about virtue, what did Socrates' answer to Mento mean relative to Sir Thomas More’s belief in virtue? Socrates’ answer implies that our own definition of values (what is right or what is wrong) plays an important role on our thoughts and behaviors. Sir Thomas More’s belief in virtue has him executed. For More, doing what was right according to his personal values (not signing the King’s oath for reasons he did not believe in) was more important than what was right for others (signing King’s oath to save his friendship with the King, because of the Duke’s convincing argument or his daughter’s valid pleading). Sir Thomas More’s argument was: "I will not give in because I oppose it. ..I do. ..not my pride, not my spleen, nor any other part of my appendage, but I, I, Thomas More.” It was his personal choice, his own understanding of values. It wasn’t how others (the King, the Duke or his daughter) viewed it but how he viewed. He did what was right for him.
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CHOOSING A MAP FOR LIFE: 3. Explain Peck's analogy of life being like a map. Life is like a journey that begins from a starting point to an ending point. During this journey, an individual will meet several obstacles before reaching the desired ending point. Peck explains that to be able to reach the ending point, we will need a “map for life.” The map for life helps us identify where we at and what steps to take to get to our final point. A map shows us our location, where to go and help us identify ways to get to our destination. The map of life plays the same role. If the map is right, it would gives us guidance and help us take the necessary steps in our lives. If the map is wrong or
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2011 for the course BUS 6036 taught by Professor Ivanov during the Spring '11 term at Dallas.

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RGS6036.E1EX3 - Name Course RGS6036.E1 EXERCISE 3 THE MEANING OF ETHICS 1 Describe mind tyrants and explain their significance to the study of

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