Organizing - Organizing The major factors affecting how a...

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Organizing The major factors affecting how a business is organized are usually: The size and scope of the business , and its anticipated management and ownership. Generally a smaller business is more flexible, while larger businesses, or those with wider ownership or more formal structures, will usually tend to be organized as partnerships or (more commonly) corporations. In addition a business which wishes to raise money on a stock market or to be owned by a wide range of people will often be required to adopt a specific legal form to do so. The sector and country. Private profit making businesses are different from government owned bodies. In some countries, certain businesses are legally obliged to be organized certain ways. Limited liability . Corporations , limited liability partnerships, and other specific types of business organizations protect their owners from business failure by doing business under a separate legal entity with certain legal protections. In contrast, unincorporated businesses or persons working on their own are usually not so protected. Tax advantages. Different structures are treated differently in tax law, and may have advantages for this reason. Disclosure and compliance requirements . Different business structures may be required to make more or less information public (or reported to relevant authorities), and may be bound to comply with different rules and regulations. Many businesses are operated through a separate entity such as a corporation, limited partnership or limited liability company. Most legal jurisdictions allow people to organize such an entity by filing certain charter documents with the relevant Secretary of State or equivalent and complying with certain other ongoing obligations. The relationships and legal rights of shareholders , limited partners, or members are governed partly by the charter documents and partly by the law of the jurisdiction where the entity is organized. Generally speaking, shareholders in a corporation, limited partners in a limited partnership, and members in a limited liability company are shielded from personal liability for the debts and obligations of the entity, which is legally treated as a separate "person." This means that unless there is misconduct, the owner's own possessions are strongly protected in law, if the business does not succeed. Where two or more individuals own a business together but have failed to organize a
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2011 for the course BUS 415 taught by Professor Bobsmith during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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Organizing - Organizing The major factors affecting how a...

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