com156_week1_reading3

com156_week1_reading3 - You Know This You write almost...

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Most college courses require writing. So do most jobs, which may surprise you. Good communication skills, including good writing, will help you achieve success in life. Four elements are key to good writing. Keep them in mind through- out the writing process. 3 Writing Basics Audience, Purpose, and Process You Know This You write almost every day, for many reasons. • You write a note to explain your child’s absence from school. • You e-mail a friend or coworker to ask a favor. • You text friends to make plans or just to keep in touch. IDEA JOURNAL Think of something you do well and how you got to be good at it. For more on making a point, see Chapter 5. For more on supporting a point, see Chapter 6. FOUR BASICS OF GOOD WRITING 1. It considers the needs and knowledge of the audience. 2. It ful± lls the writer’s purpose. 3. It includes a clear, de± nite point. 4. It provides support that explains or proves the main point. This chapter discusses audience and purpose ± rst because they are es- sential to effective writing. Purpose determines what a writer’s main point is, and audience determines how the writer makes that point. The chapter shows you how to structure your writing to meet the four basics of good writing and outlines the steps of the writing process. It also explains the criteria your instructor may use to grade your writing and gives you advice on how to create a writing portfolio. 45 ¡
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WRITING ESSAYS 46 Part One • How to Read and Write in College Understand Audience and Purpose Audience Your audience is the person or people who will read what you write. Whenever you write, always have at least one real person in mind as a reader. Think about what that person already knows and what he or she will need to know to understand your main idea. In most cases, assume that readers will know only what you write about your topic and main point. Your writing may be very different for two different audiences. Read the following two examples, which describe the same situation but are written for different audiences. Notice both the tone and the content of each paragraph. SITUATION: Christiane went to a big party over the weekend. She had a great time and met an interesting guy. She later describes the party in a letter to her grandmother (A) and in a text message to her friend (B): Hey, went to GR8 prty @ Mike’s!! Got waaasted, stayed out L8. Met SME1!!! Jon, total QT, drives a BMW! How RU? TTYL A. B. ¡
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WRITING ESSAYS Chapter 3 • Writing Basics 47 PRACTICE 1 UNDERSTANDING AUDIENCE Reread Christiane’s two notes, and answer the following questions. 1. How does the note to Christiane’s grandmother differ from the message to her friend? 2. How do her two audiences affect what Christiane writes (the content) and how she writes (the tone)?
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2011 for the course COM 156 taught by Professor Hampton during the Winter '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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com156_week1_reading3 - You Know This You write almost...

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