note cards 4.1-4.2 - Section 4.1 Random Variable A r andom...

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Section 4.1 Random Variable A random variable x represents a numerical value associated with each outcome of a probability experiment. A random variable is discrete if it has a finite or countable number of possible outcomes that can be listed.
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A random variable is continuous if it has an uncountable number of possible outcomes, represented by an interval on the number line. Discrete Probability Distribution A discrete probability distribution list each possible value the random variable can assume, together with its probability. A Probability distribution must satisfy the following conditions. IN WORDS
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1. The probability of each value of the discrete random variable is between 0 and 1, inclusive. In Symbols 0 P (x) 1 2. The sum of all the probabilities is 1. In symbols P (x) = 1
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P(x) = f/∑
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Guidelines for Constructing a Discrete Probability Distribution Let X be a discrete random variable with possible outcomes , ,…, . x1 x2 xn 1. Make a frequency distribution for the possible outcome
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2011 for the course ACCT 1100 taught by Professor Matter during the Spring '08 term at Metropolitan Community College- Omaha.

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note cards 4.1-4.2 - Section 4.1 Random Variable A r andom...

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