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ESPM 50AC Sp 10 Lecture 6-10

ESPM 50AC Sp 10 Lecture 6-10 - Forests Farmers and...

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QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Forests, Farmers and Government Institutions: The USDA, National Parks Service and African Americans ESPM50AC Carolyn Finney [email protected]
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QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. The Forest Service was established in 1905 and is part of the USDA. This agency manages 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands. The workforce: 44,000 employees 6.1% - Hispanic 3.9% - Native American 3.3% (1300) - African American
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QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Enslaved Africans worked as loggers, cleared land for agriculture, and used the forests for religious practices. Places like the Great Dismal Swamp became home for hundreds of runaway slaves. In the early 20th century, fear informed the African American perception of forests. There was on average a black lynching in the woods every three to four days. Early 1900’s: 195 Black owners of timber companies After WWII: “In terms of seeking status in America, blacks…have come to measure their own value according To the number of degrees they are away from the soil” - Eldridge Cleaver
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