Ch 5 Notes

Ch 5 Notes -...

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Chapter Five – Stereotypes, Prejudice and Discrimination Social Psychology  Yehuda Mivasair Stereotypes How Stereotypes form Birth Historical perspective – Japanese kamikaze pilots Political perspective – Arabs oppress women Sociocultural perspective – real differences between groups Formation – regardless of their origin in groups, how do they operate in  individuals’’ minds? Categorization – lumping people into groups saves time and cognitive energy Many problems, changes with social context Eg. In the usa, Irish were not considered the same as other whites but  now they are. Ingroups vs. outgroups Ingroup is anything that you identify with – montreal, youth, sexual  acrobat, student Outgroup is anything that you don’t identify with – Malaysian, professor,  Satanist Consequences Exaggerate differences between ingroup and outgroup – Eg. Quebecers think they are really different from the rest of  Canada
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Outgroup homogeneity effect – we think that there is a greater  similarity between outgroup members, than between members of  the ingroup Eg. All Asians are the same, all management students are the  same Possible reasons: We have little personal contact with people in the outgroup We do not encounter a representative sample from the  outgroup (we only meet a few members) Sociocultural and motivational factors Why are we more likely to use certain categories (such as race or gender)? Could be that the person was recently primed to think about it but  there are bigger reasons Social and cultural reasons  like media, and society’s general viewpoint effecting you relationships between groups power and status in society Motivational factors –  a black fireman is more likely “fireman” than “black” if your house is on  fire. Implicit personal theories about groups Entity theorists See groups in terms of traits Think they have internal similarities Look for their essence 
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Look at a group as if it were a single person Incremental theorists Less consistency within groups
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2011 for the course PSYCH 212 taught by Professor Dansullivan during the Spring '11 term at NYU.

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Ch 5 Notes -...

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