{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

7 Conformity - Social Psychology Chapter VII Conformity...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Social Psychology Chapter VII : Conformity “Flash mob” - a group of people who received instructions over the Internet, gathered voluntarily at a set time and place, performed some silly but harmless action, and dispersed. “mass psychogenic illness” - a profound form of social influence. Term social influence refers to the ways in which people are affected by the real and imagined pressures of others. Page 228 / Figure 7.1 – Continuum of Social Influence . Social Influence as “Automatic”: “Sometimes we are influenced by other people without our awareness. Studies show that people mimic each other´s behavior and moods, perhaps as a way of smoothing social interactions. Conformity: ~ the tendency to change our perceptions, opinions, or behavior in ways that are consistent with group norms. The Early Classic: Muzafer Sherif used the autokinetic effect : In darkness, a stationary point of light appears to move, sometimes erratically, in various directions. The group judgments gradually converged. “Using a simpler line-judgment task, Asch had confederates make incorrect responses and found that participants went along about a third of the time. When it comes to social support and rejection, even virtual groups have the power to shape our behavior. Why Do People Conform?: Two different reasons: 1) Informational influence influence that produces conformity when a person believes others are correct in their judgments. 2) Normative influence – influence that produces conformity when a person fears the negative social consequences of appearing deviant. People who were socially ostracized – being neglected, ignored, and excluded in a live or Internet chatroom conversation – reacted by feeling hurt, angry, and alone. The two types of influence produces different types of conformity: 1) Private conformity the change of beliefs that occurs when a person privately accepts the position taken by others. 2) Public conformity a superficial change in overt behavior, without a corresponding change of opinion, produced by real or imagined group pressure.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}