Lecture_21_freedom_of_expression_Mill

Lecture_21_freedom_of_expression_Mill - Wolff: Economic...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/5/11 Wolff: Economic Competition Lecture 21: July 21st, 2009
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2/5/11 The anti-competition argument (P1) When a form of competition is valued primarily because of the side-effects of people engaging in that competition, then it is potentially exploitative to set such competitions. (P2) We value economic competition because of the side-effects, e.g. cheaper products, higher quality. (C) Economic competition is potentially exploitative.
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2/5/11 Excusing conditions Consumers are the exploiters if they do not pay sufficient attention to the interests of those who may be harmed in the process. Conditions that prevent a potentially exploitative situation from becoming exploitative: If the exploited group is part of the group that benefits. This will often apply. If an individual had no control at all over the existence of an activity. This is not true of us. As
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2/5/11 Taking other people’s interests into account Locally Globally We do take other people’s interests These safety measures do not
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Lecture_21_freedom_of_expression_Mill - Wolff: Economic...

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