Section4.0 - Module 4 Introduction The World Wide Web is...

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Module 4 Introduction The World Wide Web is today’s public library . The Web is starting to realize the dream of housing the collective knowledge of all humanity. It builds on certain commonly accepted practices, chief among them being to encode documents in HTML. This allows Web browsers to display a variety of documents authored in any of the world’s written languages. The goals of this unit are: to learn some of the historical context that led to the development of the Web; to become familiar with some of the technology that supports the Web; to learn how HTML is used to encode documents. More specifically, by the end of the module, you will be able to: outline the history of libraries and the vision for access to everything written; describe the Internet as a cluster of connected computers; explain Internet addresses, packet routing, URIs, and the roles of TCP/IP and HTTP in supporting the Web; create a Web page, including a variety of document structures and simple images; link Web pages together using hyperlinks and provide links to email services; read and edit simple HTML. The online materials are supplemented by a small part of Chapter 4 (pp. 131-135), the last part of Chapter 1 (pp. 12-27), all of Chapter 2 (pp. 29- 59), and the first part of Chapter 3 (pp. 61-69) in Web Dragons . You are responsible for that material from the text as well as the online material.
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CS 100 Module 4 4.2 4.0 HTML and the World Wide Web © 2009, University of Waterloo It is hard to remember a time before the accessibility of so much information electronically. In this module , we’ll look at some of the technology that makes ready access to this information possible.
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CS 100 Module 4 4.3 4.1 Communicating Among Computers Our daily use of the Internet is almost an automatic process. This leads to us taking the Internet for granted, so we need to reacquaint ourselves with it in order to learn to use it more effectively. When you send information from one computer to another, you implicitly make use of many hardware components and pieces of systems software. Much like an operating system provides services for using a computer on its own, communications systems provide services for using collections of computers together. As explained in Section 1.3, a network consists of two or more computers that are connected by physical cables or satellite and radio communication. A network can be configured as a chain of computers (computer A connected to computer B, which is connected to computer C, etc.) or in the shape of a star (A is connected to B, C, D, and E, and none of the others are connected directly to each other), but more often the configurations are more general, as depicted above (A is connected to B, C, and D; B is connected to D, E, F, and G; C is connected to F; etc.).
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