Section12.0 - Module 12 Introduction When working with a...

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Module 12 Introduction When working with a large collection of documents, and especially when many contributors are collaborating, it is important to employ one or more mechanisms that provide a framework to hold those documents. In this module we will examine the mechanisms available in MediaWiki : search, for finding articles in a flat space of names; internal links, for referencing articles on related topics; categories, for grouping articles on similar topics; subpages, for organizing related articles on one topic; disambiguation pages, for distinguishing articles with similar or identical names; redirects, for associating multiple names with one article. More specifically, by the end of the module, you will be able to: choose appropriate organizational mechanisms to use in MediaWiki ; create a redirect; create a disambiguation page; rename an article.
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CS 100 Module 12 12.2 12.0 Organizing Wiki Articles © 2009, University of Waterloo In the last two modules we’ve seen an introduction to many features regarding wikis, and you have experimented with some of the features in the exercises and the assignment. In this module, we’ll look closer at how articles can be organized to improve access. The material in this unit is augmented by Chapters 5 and 6 in MediaWiki (pages 75-106).
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CS 100 Module 12 12.3 12.1 Structures for Relating Articles An article in a wiki is accessed by its name. That is, the URI for an article is composed of the URI for the wiki followed by the article’s name. For example, to find an article about Waterloo, you could type in the URI of the wiki (e.g., https://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/cs100/wiki/ ) followed by the name of the article (i.e., the full URI you would use to go directly to the article would be https://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/cs100/wiki/Waterloo ). Unfortunately, if you don’t know the article’s name, this won’t work. MediaWiki therefore provides a simple search box to find articles, saving you from guessing one name after another. If you open the wiki and type the name of the article you want in the search box , you will be taken to the article with that name if it exists (and you pressed enter or return or clicked on go ), or MediaWiki will show you a list of articles with similar names or with similar contents. It is good practice to use this method to find articles so that you don’t erroneously create a new article that duplicates (some of the) information that already exists under a slightly different name. This method of navigating around a wiki is quite limited, and so several other methods are provided to help find the pages you want. Links The most common navigational device for wikis is the embedded network of internal links. As noted in the earlier modules, placing new links in an article is made as simple as possible in order to encourage contributors to provide connections between articles as well as to identify potentially interesting articles that do not yet exist. The network of internal links forms a directed graph of articles that can
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2011 for the course CS 100 taught by Professor Bb during the Spring '11 term at University of Warsaw.

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Section12.0 - Module 12 Introduction When working with a...

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