Ch+5+Multiplexing+and+Compression

Ch+5+Multiplexing+and+Compression - Chapter Five Making...

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Chapter Five Making Connections Efficient: Multiplexing and Compression Data Communications and Computer Networks: A Business User’s Approach, Fourth Edition
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2 Key Discussion Questions for Chapter 5 What are example applications, advantages and disadvantages of each of the following types of multiplexing: Frequency division Synchronous time division Statistical time division Wavelength division What are the basic multiplexing characteristics of T-1, ISDN, and SONET/SDH telephone systems?
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3 Additional Key Questions from Ch 5 What are the characteristics of discrete multitone? What are the characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of code division multiplexing? What are the differences between lossy and lossless compression? What are the basic operations of run-length, JPEG, and MP3 compression?
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4 Multiplexing Basics Under simplest conditions, a medium can carry only one signal at any moment in time For multiple signals to share a medium, the carrying capacity of the medium must somehow be divided, giving each signal a portion of the total bandwidth Current multiplexing techniques include: Frequency division multiplexing Time division multiplexing Code division multiplexing
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5 Frequency Division Multiplexing Assignment of nonoverlapping frequency ranges to each “user” or signal on a medium All signals are transmitted at the same time, each using different frequencies A frequency division multiplexor (FDM) accepts inputs and assigns frequencies to each device The multiplexor is attached to a high-speed communications line A corresponding multiplexor, or demultiplexor, is on the end of the high-speed line and separates the multiplexed signals
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7 Frequency Division Multiplexing (continued) Analog signaling is used to transmit the data Broadcast radio and television, cable television, and (some) ellular telephone systems use frequency division multiplexing This technique is the oldest multiplexing technique Since it involves analog signaling, it is more susceptible to noise than other multiplexing techniques
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8 Time Division Multiplexing Sharing of the communication medium signal is accomplished by dividing available transmission time on a medium among users Digital signaling is used Time division multiplexing comes in two basic forms: Synchronous time division multiplexing Statistical time division multiplexing
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9 Synchronous Time Division Multiplexing The original time division multiplexing The multiplexor accepts input from attached devices in a round-robin fashion and transmits the data in a never -ending pattern T-1 and ISDN telephone lines are common examples of synchronous time division multiplexing
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11 Synchronous Time Division Multiplexing (continued) If one device generates data at faster rate than other devices, then the multiplexor must either sample the incoming data stream from that device more often than it samples the other
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Ch+5+Multiplexing+and+Compression - Chapter Five Making...

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