Chap01 - CHAPTER1 1.1Example:ModelIdentification...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
_____________________________________________________________ CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Curve Estimation _____________________________________________________________ 1.1 Example:  Model Identification One of the best ways to introduce the field of curve estimation is to show what it can  do.  Following is a re-analysis of two data sets originally published by W.F.R. Weldon in  an 1893 paper that may have been the first ever to advocate statistical analysis as a  primary method for studying biological problems (Pearson, 1906).  In Weldon's time, few  biologists had any mathematical training and few considered quantitative techniques  especially applicable to their subject.  For example, species were classified on the basis  of the description of one animal that was thought to be normal or typical, along with a  few notes on other individuals exhibiting unusual characteristics.  Weldon, on the other  hand, was a firm believer in the new discipline of biometry.  In his own words, which  began the first issue of the journal  Biometrika , Weldon states that inquiries into  evolutionary biology must be based "not [on] an individual but a race, or a statistically  representative sample of a race"  (Weldon, 1901). With this idea in mind, Weldon set to work collecting and measuring 2000 female  shore crabs, half from Plymouth Sound in England and half from the Bay of Naples.  On  each crab Weldon made 11 different measurements, mostly concerning the dimensions of  the carapace.  Table 1.1 summarizes the data from one of the measurements, the right  antero-lateral margin of the carapace, from the sample of crabs from Naples Bay.  The  data are expressed as percentages of the total carapace length and have been rounded off  to the nearest .004. To aid in his data analysis, Weldon used a graphical tool much like the histogram  shown in Figure 1.1.  Although routinely employed by statisticians and other scientists,  histograms are rarely appreciated for what they really are  -  curve estimators.  Specifically, histograms are estimators of the probability density function.  (Although not  strictly identical in the mathematical sense, the terms curve and function will often be  1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
used interchangeably throughout this book, except where there is a possibility of  confusion.)  While commonly too coarse to provide detailed information, histograms can  reveal gross characteristics of the density such as extreme skewness or multimodality.  From his analysis, Weldon was able to conclude that the true distribution of the  measurements was symmetric.  In fact, he went so far as to assert that there was close  2
Background image of page 2
agreement between the estimated density and the normal density function. Figure 1.2 is a more modern density estimator of the crab data that was constructed 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

Chap01 - CHAPTER1 1.1Example:ModelIdentification...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online