Cog Ch 3-Perception

Cog Ch 3-Perception - PSY332Cognition Dr.LisaMaxfield...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PSY 332 – Cognition Dr. Lisa Maxfield Perception Chapter 3 Lecture Notes Goldstein text, 3 rd  edition Note:  Although I often use the text as a guide for lecture notes, this chapter is an  exception.  I will diverge quite a bit from the text’s examples, though the main themes  remain the same. Perception Definition:  mental experiences resulting from stimulation of the senses In this light, perception is the gateway to all of the other cognitions that we will learn  about in this course Major “take home” lesson today: Incorrect:   Perception is  only  about the sensory stimuli in the environment (what is in  the world to see, hear, smell, touch, and taste).   Correct:   Much of the process of perception comes from  information we impose  on  sensory stimuli, not from the sensory stimuli themselves! Let’s start with the sensory stimuli first, though. ..
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Bottom-Up Processing Perception starts at the receptors (eyes, ears, etc.) BU Processes refers to information processing that is determined solely by  sensory / environmental input  The sensory stimuli (visual info, sound, etc.) is the only input involved BU Model:  Feature Detection   (Note:  This is NOT in your text) Support for Feature Detection Models of Perception Behavioral o Visual Search o Looking for a target among many distractors o Relevant:  Search for target is ___________ if target has a single  feature  distinct from distractors Neuroscience o As we learned in Chapter 2, some neurons are feature detection neurons o In vision, there are neurons in the retina and the cortex that detect  (respond best) to specific  features , such as _________________ o Relevant:  Neurons are “specialized” to respond to single features
Background image of page 2
Today, we are going to build a Connectionist Model of Feature Detection Connectionism Ground-breaking, early 1980s Proposed by cognitive psychologists and mathematicians Computer modeling of cognitive processes Still highly influential today Basic Structure  of a Connectionist Model A network of detectors  o Detectors are called nodes o Represented in the model by “circles” o Each detector represents a specific “concept” Nodes communicate with one another through Connections o Imagine electrical wires Connections are either Excitatory o Nodes at ends of connection share similar / consistent information o Represented in the model by “arrows” Inhibitory o Nodes at ends of connection have different / inconsistent information o Represented in the model by “dots” Basic Function  of a Connectionist Model The  level of activation  in the nodes is constantly changing as information is being 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 24

Cog Ch 3-Perception - PSY332Cognition Dr.LisaMaxfield...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online