lecture 9 vision

lecture 9 vision - 10/13/2008 Lecture 9: Vision Overview 1....

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10/13/2008 1 Lecture 9: Vision Overview 1. Review 2. Anatomy of the eye 3. Properties of light 4. Blind Spot 5. Brain regions involved 6. Damage to visual system Review Forebrain Basal Ganglia – Voluntary movements Limbic system - Emotion Cortex Parietal – somatosensory cortex Frontal – Motor cortex and executive functions Temporal - Auditory Occipital - Visual – Entails an inquiry into how the brain acquires knowledge of the external world - not a simple matter. – Visual stimuli do not offer stable code of information – (1) an object retains its known color despite changes in lighting conditions (2) visual stimuli does not change, yet we perceive different things. Study of Visual System: – We receive information about environment from sensory receptors . – Sensory receptors: specialized neuron — detect a variety of physical events. – Sensory Transduction: process by which sensory stimuli (physical energy) are transduced (converted) into a neural.
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10/13/2008 2 – For an individual to see, an image (stimulus) must be detected by photoreceptors located on the retina . – The image causes changes in the electrical activity of millions of neurons in the retina, which results in messages being sent through the optic nerve to the rest of the primary visual cortex (V1, striate cortex) , in the occipital lobe . General Overview of Visual System: Anatomy of the Eye Peripheral retina Composed of several layers of cells of which three are particularly important for vision: photoreceptors bipolar cells ganglion cells Peripheral Retina Cellular Organization of Retina
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10/13/2008 3 Properties of light • Light can be thought of as – Particles of energy (photons) – Waves of electromagnetic radiation 760 nm (Red 380 nm (Violet 2) Wavelength = Hue (Freq. Of 1) Amplitude/Intensity = Brightness (Red) (Violet) Oscillation)/Color 3) Purity (One Wavelength) = Saturation Photoreceptors: Rods and Cones convert light to neural impulse Rods abundant in the peripheral retina best for dim light provide achromatic (colorless) vision provide poor acuity
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course PSY 370 taught by Professor Zalava during the Fall '09 term at CSU Long Beach.

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lecture 9 vision - 10/13/2008 Lecture 9: Vision Overview 1....

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