TEST 2 - TEST 2 13:11 Self-concept I[September.13.2010 •...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: TEST 2 13:11 Self-concept I [September.13.2010] • Who are you? o In individualist societies, we look for what makes us unique o We also look for ways to define who we are in an uncertain world o To do that, we form a self-concept • Self-Concept o Organized collection of beliefs about the self o Combination of self-schemas o The individual beliefs about the self o Come from physical, intellectual, emotional, relational, and other components of life o Beliefs about the self-influence our possible selves o Conceptions about the kind of person we might become in the future o Self-concept gives us a sense of continuity ; past to present to future • Stable vs. flexible o Self-concept is stable to a point o We resist attempts to change it o Tends to become flexible during major changes in social settings o Stability/flexibility allows us to maintain a sense of who we are while allowing us to adapt • Who Are you Really? o Actual self vs. ideal self vs. ought self o Who we actually are o Who we want to be o Who we think we should be o Self-discrepancy is the mismatch between these three selves • Discrepancies and feelings o Discrepancies can cause a variety of negative feelings, such as agitation and dejection o The degree to which you feel them depends on the size of the discrepancy and how important it is to you • Coping with self-discrepancies o Change your behavior o Blunt your self-awareness o Refocus on your positive traits • How to Make a Self-concept o Social comparison- we compare themselves to other to assess our abilities o Upward and downward from reference group o “above average” effect-People tend to see themselves more positively than they really are o feedback from others o first from parents and family, then peers and authority figures o loved ones can “sculpt” us into our ideal selves, but only to a point o “romance novel” fallacy o feedback tends to reinforce self-views o social context- our self-concept adapts to fit a particular context o responsible at work, fun-loving among friends, childish at home o can impact self-evaluations o culture! o Different cultures shape different self-concepts o Western cultures (America and Europe) are individualist o Eastern/Southern cultures (Asia and Africa) are collectivist o Other subcultures have tendencies one way or other • Culture and the Self o Individualistic cultures put personal goals ahead of group goals o Define oneself in terms of personal attributes, not group memberships o Collectivists do the opposite o Independent and interdependent views of self o Independent selves are unique and distinct from others o Interdependent selves are part of a web, connected to others, value harmony The self-concept: part deux [September 15.2010] • Self-esteem o One’s overall assessment of one’s worth as a person o Low self-esteem isn’t so much feeling negative about oneself, but not knowing oneself • Trait and scale o Trait self-esteem- [STABLE]ongoing sense of one’s abilities and characteristics o State self-esteem- how you feel about yourself in the moment •...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course ECOL 3530 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UGA.

Page1 / 29

TEST 2 - TEST 2 13:11 Self-concept I[September.13.2010 •...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online