CH2 P1 - Ch2 What is a Measurement quantitative observation comparison to an agreed upon standard every measurement has a number and a unit Anna

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Anna Toy-Palmer 1 Ch2 What is a Measurement? quantitative observation comparison to an agreed upon standard every measurement has a number and a unit
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Anna Toy-Palmer 2 A Measurement the unit tells you what standard you are comparing your object to the number tells you 1.what multiple of the standard the object measures 2.the uncertainty in the measurement After we learn scientific notation for the “number” section of a measurement, and handling mathematical operations, we will explore units and conversions between different units
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Anna Toy-Palmer 3 Chem 100 Appendix: Mathematics Review Chapter 2 a. Scientific Notation a. Significant Figures Rounding Mathematical Operations
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Anna Toy-Palmer 4 Chem 100 Appendix: Algebra Review If 3 times a number is equal to 8 minus that number, what is the number? 3y = 8 - y 1. When solving for a variable, isolate that variable on one side of the equation. 2. When adding, subtracting, multiplying or dividing, perform the operation on BOTH sides of the equation.
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Anna Toy-Palmer 5 Chem 100 3 y = 8 - y Want y on one side. Add y to both sides. 3 y + y = 8 – y + y 4 y = 8 Divide by 4 on both sides 4 y = 8 4 4 y = 2
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Anna Toy-Palmer 6 Chem 100 Examples: P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 solve for V 2 solve for x solve for T i solve for b y x = + 2 7 3 ) ( i f T T mC q - = 3 32 = - b b
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Anna Toy-Palmer 7 Chem 100 Examples: P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 solve for V 2 V 2 = P 1 V 1 P 2
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Anna Toy-Palmer 8 Chem 100 I. Chapter 2 1. Scientific Notation -- number written as a decimal part (between 1 and 10) times an exponent of 10 1,500,000 = 1.5 X 10 6 0.00540056 = 5.40056 X 10 -3 3.8 X 10 8 = 380,000,000 2.9 X 10 -9 = 0.0000000029
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Anna Toy-Palmer 9 Chem 100 1. Why is Scientific Notation Useful? Can express range of values easily and compactly Distance from Earth to nearest star Proxima Centauri 39,900,000,000,000,000 meters or 3.99 X 10 16 meters Approximate diameter of an atom 0.000000001 meters or 1 X 10 -9 meters
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Anna Toy-Palmer 10 Chem 100 1. How do we convert a number into scientific notation? Count number of times move decimal point to the left (positive exponent) to generate a decimal number between 1 and 10. 186,000 miles/sec (speed of light) Five places to the left gives 1.86 with an exponent of 5 1.86 X 10 5 miles/sec
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Anna Toy-Palmer 11 Chem 100 1. How do we convert a number into scientific notation? Count number of times move decimal point to the right (negative exponent) to generate a decimal number between 1 and 10 0.000000004 meters (Smallest neuron width) Nine places to the right gives 4 with an exponent of -9 4 X 10 -9 meters
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Anna Toy-Palmer 12 Chem 100 1. Quick Summary If the absolute number > 1 and < 10, you won’t need an exponent (exponent is zero) Examples 3.14 (also 3.14 X 10 0 ) 9.27 1.0
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Anna Toy-Palmer 13 Chem 100 1. Quick Summary If number >10, you’ll get a positive exponent (count number of places moved decimal to the left) Examples 10 1.0 X 10 1 2504 2.504 X 10 3 325000000 3.25 X 10 8
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course CHE M 100 taught by Professor Palmer during the Spring '09 term at CSU Northridge.

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CH2 P1 - Ch2 What is a Measurement quantitative observation comparison to an agreed upon standard every measurement has a number and a unit Anna

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