CH3 - Chem 100 Chapter 3 a. Matter and classification b....

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Anna Toy-Palmer 1 Chem 100 Chem 100 Chapter 3 Chapter 3 a. Matter and classification b. Physical properties classification c. Chemical composition classification d. Chemical versus physical changes e. Conservation of Matter f. Energy g. Temperature h. Heat Capacity
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Anna Toy-Palmer 2 Chem 100 Chem 100 Chapter 3 -- Matter and classification Chapter 3 -- Matter and classification Classification allows us to evaluate similarities and differences in properties Can classify by physical properties a. Solids b. Liquids c. Gases Examples include water, ice, carbon dioxide, lava, nitrogen, quartz
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Anna Toy-Palmer 3 Chem 100 Chem 100 Solids Solids i. Solids – crystalline in nature Atoms or molecules arranged in geometric pattern with long-range, repeating order Examples: salt, sugar, diamonds ii. Maintains shape iii. Molecules packed close together iv. Not compressible (has definite volume)
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Anna Toy-Palmer 4 Chem 100 Chem 100 Solids Solids i. Solids – amorphous Atoms or molecules do not have long-range order Example: plastics, glass ii. Maintains shape iii. Molecules packed close together iv. Not compressible (has definite volume)
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Anna Toy-Palmer 5 Chem 100 Chem 100 Liquids Liquids Examples: water, gasoline i. Takes shape of the container ii. Molecules packed close together iii. Not compressible (has definite volume)
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Anna Toy-Palmer 6 Chem 100 Chem 100 Gases Gases Examples: helium, air i. Fills shape of container ii. Molecules separated by large distances iii. Compressible (Volume is indefinite)
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Anna Toy-Palmer 7 Chem 100 Chem 100 If a block of ice melts into water, the physical states observed are: a) Solid, gas b) Solid, liquid c) Liquid, gas d) None of the above
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Anna Toy-Palmer 8 Chem 100 Chem 100 Chapter 3 Chapter 3 Can classify by chemical composition instead of physical states Are the substances pure? If they are, are they elements or compounds? If not, are the mixtures homogeneous or heterogeneous?
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Anna Toy-Palmer 9 Chem 100 Chem 100 Matter Pure substances Mixtures Elements Compounds Homogeneous Heterogeneous Chemical Classification Flowchart
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Anna Toy-Palmer 10 Chem 100 Chem 100 Pure substances: Pure substances: Consists of only one type of atom or molecule Examples of elements: helium gas, oxygen gas, aluminum Examples of compounds: salt, sugar, ammonia, propane liquid What do you think the difference is between pure compounds and elements?
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Anna Toy-Palmer 11 Chem 100 Chem 100 Mixtures Mixtures Substances which contain two or more different types of atoms and/or molecules combined in variable proportions i. Homogeneous mixtures: (two or more substances thoroughly mixed together so that the composition is uniform) ii. Examples include Coke, Sprite, air, sea water, bronze, steel
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Anna Toy-Palmer 12 Chem 100 Chem 100 Mixtures Mixtures i. Heterogeneous mixtures (two or more substances mixed together where composition is variable (not uniform) ii. Examples include pepper, oil and water
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course CHE M 100 taught by Professor Palmer during the Spring '09 term at CSU Northridge.

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CH3 - Chem 100 Chapter 3 a. Matter and classification b....

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